Cobwebs

Cobwebs

Spiders can be great. They eat insects and keep away the mosquitoes and flies. They can also be a bit creepy. For instance, when an eight-legged creepy crawler surprises you in the corner of your shower, it’s not exactly the most pleasant experience.

But I digress.

The real topic at hand here is about the magical cobweb. How does it appear? Where does it come from? And more importantly… how do you clean it?

First of all, what exactly is a cobweb?

A cobweb is actually an old, dusty spider’s web that has been abandoned by their former inhabitants.

What does it mean if you have cobwebs?

You have a new arachnid friend hanging around the nooks and crannies of your home. He’s probably perusing his way around the house, looking for new places to create a web to catch his next meal.

Why does it get so dirty?

The residual spider silk left behind is very sticky. This attracts pollen, dust and other remnants, making the cobweb grimy and creepy looking.

Running into a cobweb is usually unexpected and always unpleasant. Get rid of those cobwebs simply by using the extension nozzle on your vacuum to suck them up. Windows, doors, ceilings and corners are prime real estate for those daddy long legs to make a comfortable home.

If you don’t have a vacuum, a sock at the end of your broom will do just fine.

Prevention is key to keeping the cobwebs from forming in your home. Spiders taste with their legs (weird fact of the day) and will stay away from any room that has lemon, peppermint or eucalyptus within it.

Take a cotton ball and dab it with one of these essential oils. Place them in areas around your home to deter spiders from entering. If you can’t reach an area, spray the oils directly on the space to keep the spiders out.

It’s a simple solution and win-win situation: your house smells great and you end up keeping the creepy crawlers from making themselves at home!